neuro
Rudebeck lab
Neurobiology of Emotion & Cognition

In our daily lives we often encounter both pleasurable and aversive situations, which heighten our emotional state and affect cognition. The ability to flexibly regulate our emotions in response to such events is essential for adapting to our environment and, ultimately, for our mental health. Many forms of mental illness involve dysfunction in the neural systems that regulate affective processing and decision making. The limbic system, which includes parts of the prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe, is critical for regulating emotions and plays an essential role in cognition. The main focus of the Rudebeck lab is to understand how interaction between the prefrontal cortex and subcortical structures such as the amygdala contribute to emotional regulation and decision-making. To do this, we use a combination of behavioral, autonomic, neurophysiological and interference methods in animal models.

Rudebeck PH, Putnam PT, Daniels TE, Yang T, Mitz AR, Rhodes SE, Murray EA. A role for primate subgenual cingulate cortex in sustaining autonomic arousal. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2014 Apr; 111(14).

Peter Rudebeck

Dr Rudebeck joined the department of Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in 2014 as an Assistant Professor. His training and background are in neuropsychology and neurophysiology.

The Orbitofrontal Oracle: Cortical Mechanisms for the Prediction and Evaluation of Specific Behavioral Outcomes.
The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has long been associated with the flexible control of behavior and concepts such as behavioral inhibition, self-control, and emotional regulation. These ideas emphasize the suppression of behaviors and emotions, but OFC's affirmative functions have remained enigmatic. Here we review recent work that has advanced our understanding of this prefrontal area and how its functions are shaped through interaction with subcortical structures such as the amygdala. Recent findings have overturned theories emphasizing behavioral inhibition as OFC's fundamental function. Instead, new findings indicate that OFC provides predictions about specific outcomes associated with stimuli, choices, and actions, especially their moment-to-moment value based on current internal states. OFC function thereby encompasses a broad representation or model of an individual's sensory milieu and potential actions, along with their relationship to likely behavioral outcomes.

Special thanks to Jay Frisch and Veronica Szarejko for video production.